The basic unit of money in London at this time was the English pound (£), which was further divided into 20 shillings or 240 pence. The system goes back to the early middle ages, and was kept basically intact until 1970. Shown here is a gold pound coin of James I's reign (1603-1625). If you look carefully at the top right edge, you will see '-OBUS', the last letters in Jacobus, the Latin word for James. It is marked 'XX' because a pound consisted of twenty shillings (s.)
   (source: rubens.anu.edu.au)


English Pound

A pound was a lot of money—three months' wages for a servant—so other coins, of smaller value, were in circulation during the early seventeenth century.

  (source: http://www.portsdown.demon.co.uk/coin.htm)

Sixpence Coin
Silver
Shilling
12
Pence or 1 Shilling
"
Sixpence
6
Pence
"
Half Groat
2
Pence
"
Penny
1
Pence
"
Halfpenny
1/2
Pence
Copper
Farthing
1/4
Pence

A common coin of the period was the sixpence (equal to half a shilling), here seen silver-minted in 1627, at the start of Charles I's reign.
   
(source: http://www.vosper4coins.co.uk/slideshow/index.htm)



Guinea Coin

During the reign of Charles II (1660-1685), England once again had access to a ready supply of gold, and the guinea coin below (a guinea is 21 s., or just over a pound) commemorates the Royal Africa Company, whose badge was the elephant.
   (source: rubens.anu.edu.au)